Scams come in many varied forms

 

December 5, 2019



From the editor:

A few weeks ago, a reader called our office to report a new version of a telephone scam relating to Social Security. The caller noticed that his phone's caller ID showed the call originated from the Olympia area.

Of course the call didn't originate from any Social Security Adminstration (SSA) office; they don't contact people that way.

Here are some tips for spotting scams from the website:

Scammers commonly target people who are looking for Social Security program and benefit information. You might receive an advertisement in the mail, but it could be from a private company or even a scammer. U.S. law prohibits people and businesses from using words or emblems that mislead others. Their advertising can’t lead people to believe that they represent, are somehow affiliated with, or endorsed or approved by Social Security or the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (Medicare).

If you receive misleading information about Social Security, send the complete advertisement, including the envelope it came in, to:

Office of the Inspector General Fraud Hotline

Social Security Administration

P.O. Box 17768

Baltimore, MD 21235

Scams can also happen online. A growing tactic for scammers is to use online dating sites. According to the United States Postal Inspection Service’s recent messaging, before starting an internet-based relationship, we should always keep our personal details to ourselves until you meet face-to-face. Next, do an internet search of the other person’s name and the town they claim to be living in.


Here are indications that someone may not be who they say they are:

A mismatch between their name and the name embedded in their email address.

There are obvious spelling and grammar errors.

They asked if you would send or receive money/packages on someone else’s behalf.

They need money right away due to a medical emergency, or they need a visa or air tickets. Or, a business opportunity arose that was too good to turn down. Can you wire a loan?

If anyone asks for your Social Security number, never give it to them. And if they are specifically pretending to be from Social Security, report the information to the Office of the Inspector General at 1-800-269-0271 or online.

For more information, visit the Office of the Inspector General’s website, that of the SSA, https://www.ssa.gov/phila/scams.htm.

 

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