The Wahkiakum County Eagle - Established as The Skamokawa Eagle in 1891

Downriver Dispatches

News of Western Wahkiakum County and Naselle

 

February 24, 2022

If you were a logger working seven miles up Fossil Creek Road in the Grays River area, this is what you would have seen Monday morning. Photo courtesy of Nate Engleson.

Aunt Hattie: My sweet 96-year old aunt who lives in Arizona called last weekend. I gave her The Wahkiakum County Eagle as a gift. She told me she loves to read about "the old people" who lived here over 100 years ago. She knew me as a baby and young girl. She is a jewel who lives alone, cleans her house herself and loves Hallmark movies. I love hearing her feedback and her stories as much as I love the stories our folks here tell of their early years here. Don't forget to ask for a story when you visit your elders. For some folks, it only takes one question and they're off remembering something they love to visit again. Memories are gold.

Girls Rule: "The Lady Comets brought home the first district championship in 41 years. I am very proud of these young ladies and their coaches." So says Justin Laine, principal at Naselle/GRV schools. We are all very proud and excited for games they have played and games to come. This Saturday, they play Evergreen Lutheran at 2 p.m. at Mark Morris High School in 1B Regional. The winner plays at State 1B in Spokane starting on March 21. The boys basketball team will play Neah Bay at noon this Saturday at Mark Morris High School. So proud of both teams!

Photo of the Week: Nate Engelson's photo of a log truck and equipment in snow up Fossil Creek is a fun one. While we may not always get much snow down here where we live, up high there's always more. When the Torppa Construction pickups come back to the shop at the end of the day, I'm often surprised at the mud all over them, then I remember where they've been. Often they are in areas that have not seen anyone for many years. They go in first. They rebuild old roads, take down trees that have grown in the way and put in culverts that have rusted out over the years. So, yes, they are in the mud. So are the farmers. Rubber boots are the answer for most of us, especially kids. And a pressure washer to clean vehicles and houses helps.

Johnson Park: Denise Blanchard sent information on upcoming activities. There will be a Super Sale on March 19 from 9 to 4. Book a table to reserve your space. All tables must be paid in advance. To reserve a table, call Denise at (360) 355-0472 on her cell or leave a message at Johnson Park at (360) 465-2310. Easter Craft Day will be on April 9 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kim Angelis and Jennifer Goodenberger Concert: Kim Angelis from Naselle will play her violin, and Jennifer Goodenberger will accompany her on the piano at the Naselle Community Center on March 5 at 2 p.m. Donations at the door. Refreshments after and CD's for sale. Kim's music is always relaxing and enjoyable. Jennifer Goodenberger is active as a solo and collaborative pianist. She has released eight solo piano CDs of original compositions, classical music, and arrangements of folk and Celtic music.

Karl Marlantes: Author Karl Marlantes will speak at the Naselle Community Center on March 19 at 2 p.m. Until March 1, tickets will be $10. Then tickets will be $15 and at the event they will be $20. All tickets can be purchased on-line at the following website: https://www.appeloarchives.org/product-page/karl-marlantes-deep-river. Marlantes wrote the very popular book, "Deep River." It is a family epic of human suffering, courage and love. Set in the early 1900's, it is the story of immigrants who came to SW Washington from Finland. One important aspect of the story is the history of the unions which started in our area and grew to be an important moment in logging history. The union stories are not told in many books so "Deep River" is an exciting addition to the logging history we are so proud of. Marlantes himself grew up in a logging town on the Oregon coast, commercial fishing with his grandfather. He graduated from Yale University and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University before serving as a Marine in Vietnam. The Appelo Archives has several copies for sale if you'd like to read it before attending this special event. While the book is titled "Deep River," the map inside the front of the book is inaccurate because the area called Deep River is actually the Naselle River. Marlantes decided to name the book "Deep River" because readers would have a hard time pronouncing Naselle, especially if used in its original spelling of "Nasele." The characters have Finnish names and they are sometimes hard to pronounce. A list of names is also at the front of the book with pronunciations provided. On the first page, we learn why the Finnish culture supports education at a time in history when not many were well educated at all: "The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland would not confirm an illiterate child, and this made even the poorest of Finnish peasants different from peasants in almost all other European countries: all children learned to read in church-led confirmation classes." This book is written so well and is so interesting that although it's long, it's a fast read. Get your tickets soon so you have a guaranteed seat. There will most likely be a full audience.

Senior Lunches: The Senior Lunch Club meets the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the Rosburg Hall. The next lunches will be on March 2 and 16 at noon. The CAP box lunches are available for pick up every Thursday at noon at Rosburg Hall. Call Denice at (360) 762-3111 to reserve yours.

Word of the Week: Read.

 

Reader Comments(0)

 
 

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2021